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West Nile Virus, Princess In Diamonds, Johnny Trotter - (10/2/12) West Nile virus (WNV) causes a potentially fatal encephalomyelitis (inflammation of the brain and spinal cord) in a variety of mammals such as...

 

Weaning - (6/16/12) One of the most dreaded times for owners, mares and foals is upon us. It's called WEANING!! Few owners can be completely unmoved by the heart tugging task of separating a mare from her foal. However, with proper preparation and planning it can...

 

Embryo Vitrificaction - (5/18/12) The ability to preserve valuable genetics is important in the equine industry. Royal Vista Southwest understands this need. That is why vitrification is...

 

Height of Breeding Season - (3/24/12) This particular newsletter is a little different than all the others. You see, it truly is the "height of breeding season". Take a look at what we came up with when its a little hard to get veterinarians to sit down and write an article.

 

Passive Transfer (IgG) - (2/24/12) The term passive transfer refers to the transfer of antibodies from the mare's colostrum, to the blood of the foal. The foal is capable of absorbing whole proteins (antibodies) through the gut wall the first 18 hours of life. This is critical since ...

 

Meconium Impaction - (2/9/12) One of the common problems encountered by a newborn foal is meconium impaction. Meconium is the first fecal material passed by a newborn and is usually passed within the first several hours of life. Meconium can be greenish to dark brown in color and is comprised of digested amnionic fluid, gastrointestinal secretions, bile, and cellular debris that accumulate in the intestinal tract of the late-term fetus. Meconium impaction is the most common cause of ...

 

Retained Placenta - (1/26/12) Retained placenta after foaling is one of the most common problems in the post partum mare. This usually presents itself as membranes protruding from the vulva more than 3 hours after delivering the foal. Less commonly, no part of the placenta is visible at the vulva or only a portion of the placenta has been passed. Therefore, it is very important to ...

 

Be A LifeSAVER - (1/12/2012) Simply looking at your pregnant mares may save your foal's life! Establish a routine. Note each mare's behavior within the herd. Is she the first to eat? The last? Does she have a buddy? Establish in your mind ...

 

Attended Foaling - (12/29/11) An attended foaling is imperative to ensure a good outcome for both your mare and her newborn foal. There are many situations that can occur during foaling that can be easily corrected simply by ...

 

Foaling Preparations - (12/15/11) The birth of a foal is a highly anticipated event that requires attentive management to ensure the best possible outcome. The first step is determining an accurate foaling date. Normal gestation in the mare can be...

 

Lighting Mares - (12/1/11) Lighting is one of the most productive tools used to manage broodmares. Most mares will not cycle until late March or even early May if not exposed to arificial lights. When lights are started December 1st, 80% of mares...